Indigenous Health Education to Career Initiative
Research confirms a direct correlation between increasing the number of Indigenous people in health professions, and decreasing Indigenous health inequities. With this in mind, FNHA engaged ICGE to conduct an environmental scan of post-secondary health and health-related programs across the Fraser Salish region and a global search for best practices in career development programs provided by Indigenous health boards, and table recommendations based on the findings.

Research confirms a direct correlation between increasing the number of Indigenous people in health professions, and decreasing Indigenous health inequities. With this in mind, FNHA engaged ICGE to conduct an environmental scan of post-secondary health and health related programs across the Fraser Salish region and a global search for best practices in career development programs provided by Indigenous health boards, and table recommendations based on the findings.

The findings were surprising and significant.
• 25,000 data-points were recorded from 1,500 individual programs offered within the region, by 5 public and 44 private institutions.
• None of the 44 private institutions offered Indigenous student services.
• The 5 public institutions only offered “Supporting Services”, to reduce inequities among Indigenous students and increase their Capacity to Engage in health careers. None offered “Excelling Services”, to inspire Indigenous student interest in the health sector and build their Confidence to Excel.
• Only two Indigenous health boards—in New Zealand and the U.S.—had developed programs dedicated to increasing Indigenous presence in the health sector.
• Recognizing that Supporting and Excelling Services are equally important (since each provides unique and valuable benefits) ICGE introduced the term Binary Merit Approach® to describe this as Best Practice.

Success Indicators:
The findings and analysis present a singular opportunity for FNHA to advance Indigenous health outcomes and further the goals of both Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the United Nations Declarations of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.